6,000 Cruise Passengers Arrive In Guernsey

(Courtesy ITV)

Within cruise forums and this blog, we have often disused the impact on small islands by multiple cruise ships docking for the day. In addition  increasingly bigger cruise ships are replacing the small-medium sized ones.

Traditionally we were often talking about the various Caribbean islands becoming crowded, which are regular ports of call for the worlds biggest ships – normally American ships.

My Back Yard

However in recent years,  the UK has seen more big cruise ship visiting or operating from our ports.  Our own cruise lines like Cunard and P&O now have some vessels twice as big as they were a few decades ago. P&O has a 180,000 gross tonne vessel (Excellence class) on the order books for 2020 that will probably carry up to 6,000 passengers alone.

The UK also has many of it’s own islands, including ‘Gurnsey’, one of our ‘Channel Islands’.

Guernsey has an area of just 25 sq miles and a population of around 63,000. St. Peter Port is the capital, with a harbour. However the harbour is very small, so she is a tender-port for most cruise ships.

Adverse sea conditions and high winds often mean that this charming port of call gets cancelled, even in the UK summer time – but not always…

Read this ITV News Report : HERE

If 6,000 passengers arrive at Guernsey on the same day, the population almost increases by 10%.

I don’t see a problem if big ships are well organised (unlike Meraviglia recently) and stop at cities with good infrastructures (cruise terminals, roads etc.). However a little island like Guernsey must surely struggle to cope with the passenger numbers.

St. Peter Port is pretty small and in some cases there is one bus an hour.  Even tendering two large ships must be a very slow process and must over-crowd the harbour.

What is the solution? Improve the infrastructure and possibly take away some of an islands charm or limit the number/size of cruise ships visiting.

Malcolm

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