Costa Smeralda: Costa’s first LNG-Powered Ship

The steel cutting ceremony for the first of two ‘Helios-Class’ Costa Cruises ships  was held Wednesday 13th September 2017 at the Meyer Turku shipyard, Finland.

The ship, named Costa Smeralda, (Emerald Coast) is named after Sardinia’s main tourist area.

The ship will enter service in October 2019, with a sister ship following in 2021.

Carnival will be building a total of seven ‘Helios-Class’ cruise ships which will all be fully powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG). The ships will be shared between the Carnival brands: Carnival (2), AIDA (2), Costa (2) and P&O (1).

Each ship will be around 184,000 gross tonnes and carry up to 6,600 passengers, which will be a record.

Costa Cruises’ president Neil Palomba said, ‘The two new Costa Cruises ships are a true innovation and set new standards for the entire sector. They will be among the first cruise ships powered by LNG, spurring the development of this green technology.’ He added, ‘at 183,900gt, Costa Smeralda is also a step up in ship size – we need the new facilities to answer to the demand of our customers and to increase our competitiveness for the future.’

During the steel cutting ceremony, Costa also announced a new livery that will appear on the bow of all its ships over the coming months. The design is a stylised version of the tricolour Italian flag fluttering in the wind at sea. The ship names will also be updated and will be larger in size than the current names.

(Costa)

Malcolm says: AIDA’s first vessel called AIDAnova also had her steel cut, at the German yard, Meyer Werft on 6th September 2017. The ship will be delivered in late 2018 and an as yet unnamed sister ship, in 2021.

The Helios-class:

P&O’s Helios-class ship, see HERE

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One Response to “Costa Smeralda: Costa’s first LNG-Powered Ship”

  1. John Spooner Says:

    I wonder if anyone in upper management has considered the consequences of a fuel line leakage in the engine room with LNG.
    This fuel is much harder to fight after it has ignited.
    Should the storage tanks onboard explode there will be NO survivors on the ship.
    I will not sail on an LNG floating bomb.

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