Archive for the ‘Carnival Cruises’ Category

Fake News

July 24, 2017

 

The bombardment of the Carnival Magic was so swift and ferocious that it was already sinking before the artillery mounted on its open-air jogging track could return fire. (Courtesy The Onion)

The Onion is famously known for its humorous satire.

The Onion published a ‘Fake News’  article on July 20, 2017, reporting to claim that thousands of passengers died in a “clash” between two cruise ships in the waters off the Bahamas.   It was inspired by the  the rivalry between Royal Caribbean and Carnival Cruise lines.

Although silly and rather distasteful, more worrying to me is the fact that apparently the satirical piece was actually mistaken for real news by some readers on social media.

The Onion ‘Fake News’ Story: HERE

Malcolm

Which Is The World’s Biggest Cruise Line?

July 12, 2017

Carnival Horizon (Courtesy Carnival)

The Carnival Cruise Line is the single largest cruise brand in the world today by passenger capacity, but only barely ahead of Royal Caribbean International.

By 2027, Royal Caribbean will be the largest cruise line at an estimated annual passenger capacity of 5.7 million compared to approximately 5.0 million for Carnival, based on existing ship orders, deployment and known withdrawals.

See full ‘Cruise Industry News’ article: HERE

Carnival: The Biggest Ship They Never Built

July 7, 2017
Pinnacle?

Pinnacle? (Fincantieri rendering)

In 2004, the Carnival Corporation launched a development program called the ‘Pinnacle Project’.

The project was shrouded in secrecy, however it is said that the aim was to design the world’s biggest cruise ship at the time.

They say project Pinnacle was to be about 200,000 gross tonnes, carrying some 6,000.

Read full article HERE

Malcolm

Former Carnival Jubilee To Be Scrapped

May 8, 2017

(Courtesy RCI)

Carnival Jubilee is finally destined for the scrapyard. She was sold by Carnival in 2004 and has sailed under several names since

When introduced in 1986, Jubilee was one of three Holiday-class ships, along with the Holiday and the Celebration. And while Jubilee was the first of her class to be sold, by 2009, Carnival had divested itself of all three. The ships were around 47,000 gross tonnes and carried approximately 1,800 passengers.

The ship formerly known as Celebration, which was sold by Carnival in 2007, is known as the MS Grand Celebration and has sailed with the Bahamas Paradise Cruise lines since 2015. The Holiday was sold by Carnival in 2009, and now sails as the MS Magellan for the British company Cruise & Maritime Voyages.

(Internet)

Magellan review: HERE

Magellan, Tilbury 18/07/15

Carnival Reflection – 184,000 gt Newbuild Leaked

April 3, 2017

The Costa version of Carnival’s 184,00 gt ship.

In 2015, Carnival Corporation announced that they would be building four 183,900 gross tonne LNG ships.  Each ship will accommodate 5,200 passengers.

Costa, AIDA, P&O and Carnival would get one each between 2020 and 2022.

So far we have only seen renderings of the ‘Costa’ version.

However Travel Journalist Jordan Bailey at the excellent ‘Cruise Capital’ has found a ship model, which appears to be of the Carnival version of the 180,000 gt newbuild. This version of the ship is set to enter service in 2022.

Interestingly the model carries the name ‘Carnival Reflection’

There appears to be some new bow/hull graphics too and the distinctive Carnival funnel.

See the Carnival model at ‘Cruise Capital’ HERE

Malcolm

The Carnival Horizon to Launch in Europe

January 25, 2017
(Courtney Carnival)

(Courtesy Carnival)

Carnival Horizon will debut in April of 2018 and will offer a short Mediterranean season  before moving to New York in May.

The ship will be 133,500 gross tons and be able to carry 3,936 guests at double occupancy.

(Courtney Carnival)

(Courtesy Carnival)

“Carnival Vista delivered the next generation of ship for our brand with new, never-before-seen features at sea. From our amazing SkyRide and the WaterWorks aqua park to first IMAX Theatre on a cruise ship, Carnival Vista has offered our guests a brand new view of fun.  With Carnival Horizon, we continue to expand those themes to provide guests of all ages with the ultimate fun vacation with Carnival!” said Christine Duffy, president of Carnival Cruise Line.

(Carnival)

CL_VS_IMAX_interior_ren-copy-592x394

(Courtesy Carnival)

Images of Carnival Horizon Staterooms: HERE

New Ships for Princess and HAL

January 22, 2017
(Courtesy HAL)

(Courtesy HAL)

The Carnival Corporation has announced that it had signed a memorandum of agreement with Fincantieri to build two new cruise ships for Holland America and Princess.

With the new agreement, Carnival Corporation now has 19 new ships scheduled to be delivered between 2017 and 2022.

Holland America Line’s new ship will be built at Fincantieri’s shipyard in Marghera, Italy, with an expected delivery in 2021, and the ship for Princess Cruises will be built at Fincantieri’s Monfalcone, Italy, shipyard with an expected delivery in 2022.

Holland America Line’s new 99,500-ton, 2,660-guest ship will be its third “Pinnacle” class vessel, following the design of the line’s newest and largest ship, ms Koningsdam, and its sister ship, Nieuw Statendam, scheduled for delivery in November 2018.

Princess Cruises’ new 145,000-ton ship will carry 3,660 passengers and will be its sixth “Royal” class vessel.

The two yet-to-be-named vessels also under construction by Fincantieri scheduled for delivery in 2019 and 2020.

(Carnival)

P&O Cruises Reveals Details Of ‘Most Ambitious’ Ship

October 27, 2016

 

P&O Newbuild 180,000 gt

P&O Model (Courtesy P&O)

Construction of the latest addition to the fleet will get underway next year at Meyer Werft’s Papenburg shipyard in Germany. The ship will enter service in the UK in 2020. At 180,000 tons, it will have a capacity for up to 6,600 guests, making it the largest cruise ship ever built for the British market.

The signature heart of the ship, the Atrium, will be our boldest and brightest yet. Glass walls spanning three decks will let natural light flood in while a grand staircase, gallery and overhead walkways will provide dramatic focal points.

The ship will also be the most environmentally efficient ship in the history of P&O Cruises. Powered at sea and in port by liquefied natural gas (LNG), exhaust emissions will be significantly reduced to help protect the environment.

You’ll be treated to the best British hospitality and standards of service that you know and love.

Our new star of the show, The Dome

P&O newbuild 180,000 gt

A major new entertainment hub called The Dome will be one of the star attractions of our new ship. Featuring an impressive glass roof, a pool with a retractable stage, a water feature and whirlpools, it offers a unique space whatever the weather.

By day, The Dome is the perfect place for entertainment, relaxation and informal dining. By night, the four key entertainment spaces come alive with aerial performances, roof projections and immersive shows.

There will also be much wider than normal, half-mile promenade deck, called the “Lanai” deck, allowing for al-fresco dining.

A world of even more choice on board

Our new ship has been designed by the world’s leading design and guest experience teams to make sure you have a wealth of dining, entertainment, socialising and relaxation options to suit every mood and occasion: Choose from:

• 17 places to eat to suit all appetites and occasions
• Seven speciality restaurants
• 12 places to enjoy a drink and take in sea views
• 16 whirlpools
• Four swimming pools (three outside and one inside)
• 13 entertainment venues from the theatre to venues for adults only, including three pop-up entertainment spaces
• Nine places to have breakfast
• Five places to take afternoon tea
• Seven places to enjoy fresh coffee

Partnering with the best in the business

Design innovation is being taken to new levels by collaborations with award-winning architectural and interior design teams. We’re proud to be working with residential and commercial architects Jestico & Whiles (London), whose work includes Aquashard (London), the Yas Hotel (Abu Dhabi) and the W Hotel (London). We’re once again joining forces with Richmond International (London), who worked with us on Britannia and whose luxury hotel portfolio includes The Langham Hotel (London and Chicago), The Four Seasons Moscow, and Sandy Lane Hotel (Barbados).

The design of cabins and the flow of on-board experiences will also be developed under the expert eye of maritime architecture specialists Partner Ship Design and design experts Acumen, who developed the first lie-flat bed for British Airways and Etihad Airways’ opulent three-room sky suites.

STOP PRESS: P&O cruises has decided that it will throw open the naming process for its new cruise ship to the public. Another ‘Boaty McBoatface’ maybe?

(Source: P&O)

Below slide show:

Malcolm says: Carnival are providing AIDA, Costa and their own brand with these ships. From the P&O information above and the renderings of the Costa version of the ship, there will be some design differences between the Costa and P&O versions. For example the Costa renderings does not show a ‘Sky Dome’.

I’m still not convinced that such a large ship is a good ‘fit’ for P&O. But then I’m forgetting that P&O are no longer just catering for the ‘socks & sandals’ brigade, they are now a mass-market line hoping to attract the same passengers as Carnival, RCI and NCL.

Perhaps the most disturbing fact is that this cruise ship will carry more passengers than any other ship in history, up to 6,600. This is more that RCI’s ‘Oasis’ class, yet will be 20% smaller. You will have a little less room on-board, than on RCI’s ‘Quantum’ and ‘Oasis’ classes.

The port of Southampton will surely need more investment, in order to handle a ship carrying up to 6,600 passengers.

P&O/Costa Megaships Analysed: HERE

Are these the worlds most crowded ships? See HERE

What is an LNG ship? See HERE

A Question Of Decor

October 9, 2016

Cruise ships often have more impressive décor than most shore-side buildings.  In fact it is often braver décor than most buildings have.

Many ships also have impressive art collections on board. Some ship even have art work on deck and sport impressive hull-art.

(Quantum's Bear - RCI Image)

(Quantum’s Bear – RCI Image)

How important is a ships décor really is to the passenger experience?

Cruise lines obviously think that the décor is VERY important, given the fact they spend millions of pounds/dollars on it and regularly undertake refurbishments, re-styling the decor.

I’ve certainly been on board ships where I  have loved the décor . I’ve also been on board ships where the décor has not generally been to my liking. However sometimes different public rooms are created by different designers, so it is very possible to love some rooms, think some are mediocre and dislike others – all on the same ship.

There certainly used to be a different between UK and US style  décor on-board ships.

P&O Orian Interior (1995, Courtsey Ian Boyle)

P&O Orian Interior (1995, Courtesy Ian Boyle)

For example P&O ships décor was regarded as rather tasteful to the reserved and often very traditional Brits, when compared to the Las Vegas ‘glitz’ of many American ships. However by American tastes it was understated’ or even bland.

Since Carnival acquired P&O and provided new mega-ships, we have seen more vibrant décor for British passengers. There have also been frequent visits of big US ships to UK ports offering cruises for Brits. I believe the British cruising masses are getting acclimatised to a more bold colour schemes and more glitz.

Carnival Sensation Atrium by J. Farcus (Courtesy Carnival)

Carnival Sensation Atrium by J. Farcus (Courtesy Carnival)

Joe Farcus, the American Navel Architect, has designed some mind-blowing interiors for Carnival and Costa ships. He calls it ‘Entertainment Architecture’. It’s very original, very colourful and often very loud.  It’s Las Vegas ‘Glitz’ in style with maybe a hint of psychedelia. His work is definitely not to every-bodies taste.

Décor and ‘taste’ changes over time, of course. I think the pure-glitz has gone out of fashion and in some cases is being replaced with a more sophisticated cappuccino-café style, as I call it.

For example the ‘Norwegian Cruise Lines’ (NCL) ships built between 2001-2007 (Star, Jade, Gem etc.) all have very colourful décor in places, not unlike Farcus’s work.

Norwegian Gem (Courtesy NCL)

Norwegian Gem (Courtesy NCL)

However NCL’s ‘Norwegian Edge’ which is a $400 million revitalization program of their fleet, will see the décor updated.  For example, the image above is Norwegian Gem’s original Atrium décor. Below is the refurbishment which less over-the-top, being more sophisticated.

Norwegian Gem (Courtesy NCL) Refurbished

Norwegian Gem (Courtesy NCL) Refurbished

So how important is the décor to you? Have you been on board a  ship where the décor was not to you liking? Do you love some ships décor?  Please tell me.

Malcolm

The New P&O/Carnival Mega-Ships Analysed

September 12, 2016

Carnival has announced that they have ordered seven 180,000gt mega-ships from the German ship builder Meyer Werft: two for Costa, two for Carnival, two for AIDA and one for P&O to be delivered between 2019 and 2022.

So far we have seen the renderings of the ship in the Costa livery and  a model of the P&O version. All versions are likely to be similar, but there are clearly some differences.

As per usual the renderings are not very clear in detail. If fact details can be deliberately withheld on early renderings. However I am not going to let a lack of facts stop me at least speculating about the ships design.

Firstly we can see that the design looks relatively conventional, with no split superstructure (like Oasis) and no unusual external features like ‘North Star’ (Anthem’s observation pod).

These ships will carry a maximum of 6,600 passengers, which is a world record. That’s up to 300 more passengers than Oasis, yet she will be 20% smaller. Therefore I don’t think we can expect Parks, Ice rinks, long Internal promenades or large indoor sports halls.  These sort of features may well be too space-hungry. In addition the Costa, AIDA, P&O and to an extent Carnival brands tend to avoid such ‘gimmicks’.  Their clientele do not expect them , although such big ships are likely to have extensive family/children’s facilities. They cannot ignore that sector of the market, if they want to fill their ships.

In fact the ships design looks rather like AIDA Prima, AIDA’s newbuild. Maybe some of AIDA’s design features will feature on-board the new  megaships?

The new ships bow is quite distinctive and rather like the one featured on AIDAprima. In fact AIDAprima does not have the traditional bulbous-bow, as she uses the MALS system. Maybe these newbuilds will use the same system?

AIDAprima, Nagasaki Japan. No bulbous bow.

AIDAprima, Nagasaki Japan. No bulbous bow.

There are clearly no big LNG tanks on deck, like some LNG ships (see here), so the tanks have been integrated into the ships hull. However I believe they are not allowed to be low/deep within the hull like normal fuel tanks, for safety reasons. This may alter the ships engine room design/internal layout quite significantly.

I count 8 lifeboats per side (Oasis has seven per side). However given the higher passenger numbers, the lifeboats must be bigger. In fact I believe they are the new ‘Fassmer’(See here) ones carrying 414 passengers each, compared to the Oasis/Schat-Harding lifeboats at 370 passengers each.

The lifeboats appear to be served by their own promenade deck, to enable passengers to board the lifeboats. Such prom. decks are not great for giving passengers a sea views as the lifeboats often obscure much of them. However their appears to be a second promenade deck.

The stern features a low extended deck area, reminiscent of MSC’s ‘Seaside’ ships. There appears to be six cabanas against the railings. Seven decks rise from the stern offering prime real-estate: many aft facing balcony cabins. Maybe the row of windows below the stern deck could be a restaurant?

Looking at the Costa renderings: Leading from the aft deck area, are some steps to a raised promenade deck which runs along 80% of the side of the ship. This prom deck is above the lifeboats and obviously solely for public use and not for lifeboat boarding. It does not appear to wrap around the bow, unless it has an internal tunnel. The rendering is not specific, but this could feature some bars and restaurants like NCL’s ‘Waterfront’. (“A much wider, half-mile promenade deck allowing for al-fresco dining.” was recently reported by P&O) 

The P&O model does NOT appear to show ‘steps’ on the prom, but seems to show a level, uninterrupted one level prom. P&O call it the ‘Lanai’ deck.

NewCostaShipsLNG2ddf3

Above: Courtesy of Costa. (Click to enlarge)

 

2016-10-26-21-49kk-14-1

P&O Model

Costa: CostaThe upper superstructure (amidships) appears to have  a glass skylight and a pool. Some structures run along side of ‘skylight’ and pool, on both the port and starboard sides, sloping down to the deck. Are these the tubes of a slide or maybe a track, for some sort of ride.

200

In front of the funnel appears to be two spirals which definitely look like slides/water chutes (flumes).

(Courtesy of Seatrader)

(Courtesy of Seatradeinsider)

Costa: The central Skylight could suggest a central internal space like AIDA’s ‘Theatrium’ – a combined Atrium and performance space, with seating, rather than a conventional theatre at the bow. Carnival did mention the clever use of internal space with multi-function public rooms . (“An atrium with a glass wall the full height” has recently been reported by P&O)

I was not expecting a ‘tall’ atrium unless it had a duel role, as they are essentially a waste of space on such a busy ship.

23. (Red) AIDAprima Theatrariun

23. AIDAprima Theatrium (amidships)

1167226793

An AIDA Theatrarium – cick to enlarge (Image courtesy of AIDA)

Costa: Towards the front of the upper deck there is a cut-out which appears to be the location for a pool. The structure above it, looks like a sliding roof.

100

Costa: Behind the funnel there appears to be a glass-canopy, probably covering a pool and maybe forming a ‘Solarium’. That makes three pools on the upper deck. (It is now reported by P&O that there are three outside pools and one inside).

'Dome' behind funnel.

‘The Dome’ behind funnel.

It has since been reported by P&O : “The dome at the top of the new ship will be an entertainment space, with a pool and retractable stage, water feature and whirlpools, that can act as an all-weather venue for entertainment and dining during the day”. The Costa renderings do NOT show a Dome. It appears that the P&O’s Dome replaces a water-chute/flume on the Costa ship. This would seem to shrink the space available on the P&O sun deck.

2016-10-26-21-49-14-1bbb

The Dome

Costa: There appears to be a giant outdoor video screen at the very stern (image below), with tiered seating facing it. There appears to be a ‘scenic’ (Princess ‘Skywalkers’ type) walkway above the screen. I’m not sure if a fourth pool is hidden down there in the space.

150new

Costa: Amidships, but nearer the hull, there are three lines of windows on a curved section of the hull. This may be part of a possible ‘Theatrium’ a lounge or a dining room?

Internal Décor: I wonder if the now elderly, Mr. Joe farkus, will be creating more mind blowing interior décor as he has done for Carnival and Costa?  P&O will obviously have a more conservative approach to her décor.

One main dining room and one main theatre each holding half the ships compliment of passengers at two sittings, with two matching show-times, is the most efficient use of space (apart from when they are empty). However it is not very flexible.

Carnival ships have often had this traditional feature. However I would  expect multiple dining rooms – like NCL’s Freestyle/RCI Dynamic Dining. This may be Carnivals first real shot at a ‘flexible dining’ system like NCL’s ‘Freestyle’ or RCI’s ‘Dynamic Dining’. Although RCI have struggled to make their new system work well, so scapped it.

Four entertainment spaces have sine been reported by P&O, the Dome being one. A Theatrium could be a second, a conventional theatre could be a third, the screen with seating, at the stern, could be the fourth.

Costa 180,000gt ship

Courtesy of Costa. (Click to enlarge)

P&O have reported that there will be:

17 places to eat to suit all appetites and occasions
• Seven speciality restaurants
• 12 places to enjoy a drink and take in sea views
• 16 whirlpools
• Four swimming pools (three outside and one inside)
• 13 entertainment venues from the theatre to venues for adults only, including three pop-up entertainment spaces
• Nine places to have breakfast
• Five places to take afternoon tea
• Seven places to enjoy fresh coffee

In conclusion, the above text is a mixture of observation and guess work.

I do wonder if this new ship design will be a  little more like existing AIDA ships in design, than existing Costa, Carnival or P&O ones.

Interestingly I understand AIDA (aimed at the German market) are more relaxed in style, with a younger, more active demographic whose passengers favour buffet food. The entertainment is not the big Broadway type productions. Whereas Costa (Italian) are more traditional in style, with more formal dining and more lavish production shows.

It’s hard to imagine that one design of ship can entirely satisfies all camps.

I don’t think these ships will be very exciting, in terms of innovative spaces; Carnival tend to ‘play it safe’. They will probably be pretty conventional mass-market ships with thousands of cabins and many bars, dining rooms and shops. I believe that will be designed for maximum income generation and not spaciousness or unique facilities. Carnival have always focused on functionality and profit and leaves the innovation to the likes of RCI and NCL.

The most exciting aspects about these ships design will probably be their ‘scale’ and the LNG propulsion. However, the propulsion of course will have little impact on the passenger experience. (Apart from a soot free deck?)

Even with a half-mile promenade deck, given the passenger numbers, the pool deck is likely to be very crowded at anytime the sun shines.

I’m not suggesting that they will be bad ships. I just don’t think they will have room for generously sized public spaces or too much design-innovation. However the aspects of the design to manage the high passenger numbers, could be classed as an innovation in itself.

However the passenger density and ‘economies of scale’ offered by this ship design should enable Carnival to sell the cabins at very competitive rates.

Of course aspects of my speculation are likely to completely wrong. All comments welcome.

Malcolm

So what is an LNG powered Ship? See Here

Is LNG safe? See Here

Carnival Megaships: Gibraltar Debates LNG Safety

August 9, 2015
The 180,000gt Costa LNG ship

The 180,000gt Costa LNG ship (Image courtesy of Costa)

Carnival cruise Line’s decision to order four liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) powered 180,000gt mega-ships has been highlighted by the Gibraltar Government in an  on-going row over proposals to develop LNG bunkering infrastructure.

The cruise ships (2 for the AIDA and 2 for Costa cruise brands) will be delivered in 2019 and 2020. They will be powered by LNG hybrid engines and carry up to 6,600 passengers, giving them the largest guest capacity in the world.

“This demonstrates that the use of LNG is becoming mainstream around the world and in particular in the shipping industry,” said Chief Minister Fabian Picardo in a statement.

The harbour at Gibraltar.

The harbour at Gibraltar.

“It also demonstrates how safe a fuel LNG is. An American corporation like Carnival Cruises would not put up to 6,600 passengers in a situation of unacceptable risk or danger.” “As a Government we have already got in touch with Carnival to ensure that we see these new ships call at Gibraltar, refuelling and bringing us huge numbers of tourists.”

Carnival says: “Pioneering a new era in the use of sustainable fuels, the four new ships will be the first in the cruise industry to use LNG in dual-powered hybrid engines to power the ship both in port and on the open sea” Carnival said.

“LNG will be stored on board and used to generate 100% power at sea – producing another industry-first innovation for Carnival Corporation and its brands.”

“Using LNG to power the ships in port and at sea will eliminate emissions of soot particles and sulphur oxides.”

The statement above by Carnival was flagged up by the Gibraltar Government as evidence of the shift in the maritime industry toward the use of LNG as a fuel.

LNG bunker barge and Viking Grace an LNG ferry. See her external tanks on the stern. (Karl Gabor )

LNG bunker barge and Viking Grace. LNG ferry. Click to enlarge (Karl Gabor )

The government is exploring the possibility of establishing LNG bunkering operations alongside infrastructure for a new power station powered by gas and diesel. But the project has drawn flak from the Opposition, which has expressed serious concerns about the safety of siting LNG operations so close to built-up areas.

However a report by leading risk assessor Lloyd’s Register concluded LNG operations could pose “potentially intolerable risks”. The government responded that the report was based on incomplete data about its proposals.

Yesterday Mr Picardo renewed the government’s criticism of the Gibraltar Social Democrats on this issue.

“Given that the Opposition have already said that they will not allow LNG bunkering or the operation of an LNG facility storage and regasification facility, which is exactly what these vessels have on board, the public can clearly see that the position of Mr Feetham is highly detrimental to Gibraltar’s economic interests, from tourism to bunkering and the cost of electricity generation,” he said.

“Would he now propose to ban these Carnival ships coming to Gibraltar? Would he ban Gibraltarians from cruising on them?”

“The nonsensical nature of the GSD’s arguments is slowly being exposed. The danger to our economy of their opportunistic position is becoming palpable.”

“The safe future of marine propulsion, power generation and bunkering is clearly in the use of LNG. That is where we will position Gibraltar for maximum economic advantage.”

(Source: Courtesy of Gibraltar Chronicle/Redazione GNL)

Costa's 180,000gt LNG ship

Costa’s 180,000gt LNG ship (Image courtesy of Costa)

Malcolm says: There is much internet debate about the safety of LNG. They seems to be many contradictory opinions from both the  the expert and amateur commentators.

I’m no expert, but as far as I see it, all transport which uses fossil fuels has the challenge of safely storing and burning a very explosive substance. We rely on technology to do so. That applies equally to your car, an aircraft or conventional ship.

Carnival are obviously convinced about the fuels safety, economic and environmental advantages.  If the ports want these big ships, they will need to offer LNG.

Carnival are the only cruise line that are building LNG ships. Being the worlds biggest, they cannot be ignored.  We will soon see how successful this experiment is, if the other major cruise lines begin to order LNG ships too.

Like it or not, Carnival obviously think LNG is the future.

So what is an LNG powered Ship? See Here

The New Costa’s Megaships Analysed. See Here

Carnival: The Biggest Ship They Never Built

June 17, 2015

Not a news item, but a bit of nostalgia.

Pinnacle?

Pinnacle? (Fincantieri rendering)

In 2004, the Carnival Corporation launched a development program called the ‘Pinnacle Project’. It was shrouded in secrecy, however it is said that the aim was to design the world’s biggest cruise ship, at the time.

They say project Pinnacle was to be a 200,000 gross tonnes, 6,000 passenger prototype, cruise ship.

untitled

(Fincantieri rendering)

Around the same time Royal Caribbean International were developing their ‘Genesis’ Project, which later went on to become ‘Oasis of the Seas’.

Carnival abandoned their Pinnacle project, stating that the Dollar to Euro rate was not conducive to making such a large investment in a giant ship.

(Photo from intelcom)

(Oasis: Photo, intelcom)

Clearly RCI disagreed and ‘Oasis’ entered service in 2009, at 225,000 gt easily making her the world’s biggest cruise ship – and her class still is.

In fact there is now a third ‘Oasis’ class ship, ‘Harmony of the Seas’ in service, which is slightly bigger at around 227,000gt. RCI also have a fourth on their order books ‘Symphony of the Seas’ which will enter service in 2018.

However Carnival have announced some ‘new big’ ships for some of their Carnival, AIDA, Costa and P&O brands at around 185,000 gross tonnes carrying up to 6,600 passengers.  The first ship will be delivered in 2019 for AIDA.

I wonder if ideas from the ‘Pinnacle’ design will be incorporated into their design?

 

Below is a video from the Fincantieri shipyard, designed by Maurizio Cergol, which was almost certainly one of the ‘concepts’ for the Carnival Pinnacle:

However begining in 2019, Carnival and some of their brands such as P&O, Costa, AIDA, Carnival, will receive their biggest ships yet at 185,000 gt:

Biggest class of ship today: ‘Oasis of the Seas’ review: HERE

Malcolm

4x 180,000gt: Carnival Is Back In the ‘Big Ship’ Game

June 15, 2015

Introduction

When ‘Carnival Destiny’ entered service in  1996, she was the first cruise ship to be built over 100,000 gross tonnes.   In 1998  ‘Grand Princess’ (‘Princess Cruises’ brand) at 109,000gt was the largest cruise ship afloat.  Again in 2004, the ‘Queen Mary 2’ (‘Cunard’ brand) at 148,000gt  was the world’s biggest cruise ship.

Since 2004 Carnival have dropped out of the “my ships bigger than yours” game, blaming the unfavourable US Dollar to Euro exchange rate.  Since 2004, NCL, RCI and others have built increasingly bigger vessels. However  Carnival are back in the game with plans to build the world’s second largest class of ships*, only eclipsed by RCI’s ‘Oasis’ class. (*Based on the gross tonnage, the sandard measurement to compare ship sizes.)

However if your criteria to compare ship size is ‘passenger capacity’, these newbuilds can  legitimately be called the ‘worlds biggest’ ships.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Carnival Destiny (Image courtesy of Carnival)

News – 15 June 2015

180,000gt (Images courtesy of Costa. Click to enlarge)

180,000gt (Images courtesy of Costa. Click to enlarge)

Carnival Corporation today announced it has finalized a multi-billion dollar contract to build four next-generation cruise ships with the largest guest capacity in the industry.

The contract with Meyer Werft is part of larger previously announced strategic memo of understanding with shipbuilders Meyer Werft and Fincantieri for nine new ship orders between 2019 and 2022.

The four new ships will also feature a new “green cruising” design. The ships will be the first in the cruise industry to be powered at sea by Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG).

The company said two of the ships will be manufactured for AIDA Cruises at Meyer Werft’s shipyard in Papenburg, Germany. Additional information about the ships, including which new ships will be added to each brand, will be made available at a later date.

Based on Carnival Corporation’s innovative new ship design, each of the four next-generation ships will have a total capacity of 6,600 guests, feature more than 5,000 lower berths, exceed 180,000 gross tons and incorporate an extensive number of guest-friendly features. A major part of the innovative design involves making much more efficient use of the ship’s spaces, creating an enhanced on-board experience for guests, said Carnival.

The four new ships will be the first in the cruise industry to use LNG in dual-powered hybrid engines to power the ship both in port and on the open sea. LNG will be stored on-board and used to generate 100 percent power at sea.

Using LNG to power the ships in port and at sea will eliminate emissions of soot particles and sulphur oxides.

In addition to the two ships being built in Germany, Meyer Werft – which had the capacity to accommodate these four ship-building orders in its production schedule — will also build the two additional ships detailed in today’s announcement at its shipyard in Turku, Finland.

Carnival Corporation CEO Arnold Donald said: “We are looking forward to executing on the next step in our fleet enhancement plan,” said Donald. “At a cost per berth in line with our existing order book, these new ships will enhance the return profile of our fleet. These are exceptionally efficient ships with incredible cabins and public spaces featuring a design inspired by Micky Arison and Michael Thamm and developed by our new build teams.” Arison is chairman of the board of directors for Carnival Corporation & plc and Thamm is CEO of the Costa Group, which includes AIDA Cruises and Costa Cruises.

“These ships will expand our leadership position for the Costa Group, the market leader in all the major European markets,” said Thamm. “These will be spectacular ships designed specifically for our guests who sail on our Costa Group brands.”

(Carnival)

Malcolm Says: This is very exciting news. The press release is a bit ambiguous, but it looks like AIDA and Costa will get two of these big ships each.

So, these will be the second biggest class of ships, just 45,000 gt smaller than the ‘Oasis’ class, yet with a bigger passenger capacity of  6,600 compared to Oasis’s 6,296, all berths. (Space ratio, Oasis = 35, Carnival Newbuild = 27). Even though Carnival say they will be “making much more efficient use of the ship’s spaces” I would still expect this to make the Carnival newbuilds feel more crowded than Oasis.

I bet that these new ship shave some sort of ‘flexible’ dining, with multiple dining rooms, like RCI have now adopted, in line with NCL

Carnival tend to retain their ship designs for many years, just making slight modifications over time. Therefore I would not be surprised if we don’t see P&O and/or Cunard and Princess, getting one of these new ships, sooner or later.

Liquefied Natural Gas: Using LNG to power ships is not a completely new idea.  However to date, LNG use has been restricted to smaller vessels operating rather short runs. This is due to the large size of fuel tanks required and the few bunkering facilities available. However it is a new idea for cruise ships and certainly a megaship design. 

The most attractive aspect of LNG to the cruise line is cost.  Under the right operating conditions LNG can reduce fuel costs.

Here is an interesting example: VIKING GRACE is a European passenger ferry (2013, 57,000gt, STX, Finland) powered by LNG. Large tanks for the gas are located on deck, to save space in the hull (See image below). Will the Carnival newbuilds mimic this feature, somehow?

Viking Grace, LNG Ferry

Viking Grace, LNG Ferry

More information about LNG: HERE